November 2018

Found 5 blog entries for November 2018.

Texas Weather Report from the Texas Southwest Cattle Raisers Association.

Fewer planted acres, summer drought and late-season rains caused a significant drop in peanut production around the state, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert. Dr. Emi Kimura, AgriLife Extension statewide peanut specialist, Vernon, said planted peanut acres dropped to 155,000 acres from 275,000 acres in 2017, a 43 percent reduction.

SOUTHWEST: Temperatures were cooler with little to no rain. Some counties needed more rain, while others were hoping to dry out following recent rains. Some counties experienced the first frost of the season. Some pecan harvest was negatively impacted by wet soil, including the sprouting of some pecans. Livestock and wildlife

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Prickly pear is associated with loss of grazing both from the competition and the physical barrier it presents to livestock. Left untreated, prickly pear tends to get worse. University researchers have documented that, during drought, prickly pear density can increase 25 percent to 30 percent each year while other plants decline. At that rate, prickly pear density doubles every three years. On good range sites, access to forage can be 2x to 3x greater in the absence of prickly pear. Learn More about what you can do here. 

Dense Prickly Pears on Texas Grazing Land

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Grazing leases are a great way for absentee landowners to generate income from the ranch or farm while not having to worry about running livestock themselves. There are many considerations to factor into a grazing lease and Cari Rincker on Ag Law Today covers a lot of these important factors. View the article and link to the episode here. 

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Grazing leases are a great way for absentee landowners to generate income from the ranch or farm while not having to worry about running livestock themselves. There are many considerations to factor into a grazing lease and Cari Rincker on Ag Law Today covers a lot of these important factors. View the article and link to the episode here. 

 

A sheep looking over rise in a meadow in Texas

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Person on horseback driving a herd of longhorn cowsIn the early years of the grass-farming movement, much of the information and teaching came from New Zealand, Argentina, and Africa.

Many of the biological principles were not completely applicable to North America and at least some of it was just plain wrong.

Nonetheless, great progress has been made and the economics are sound. That's because the grass-farming movement has its base in the concept that large ruminants often grazed in huge herds and were surrounded by predators and kept in close-knit, sometimes agitated herds across most prairies and savannahs in North America.

Most soil fertility was built as the result of the huge herds traveling and living in very high densities and their here-today and gone-for-many-tomorrows relationship to

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