Hunting Leases 101

Posted by Richmond Frasier on Wednesday, September 4th, 2019 at 7:06pm.

A hunting lease is an agreement between you (the lessor) and hunters or anglers (the lessees) that allows them to visit and hunt on your land for a specified time period. Your lessees pay you per acre or per lessee for their hunting experience. 

This post will give you a quick rundown of hunting leases as well as resources to help you get started if you decide you would like to lease your own land out or if you are looking for a place to privately hunt.

What is a hunting lease?

Types of Land Leases:

It is good to know that you have options when wanting to lease out your own property or if you are searching for private land to start hunting on. That being said, it is good to keep in mind that a landowner can only agree to as much as their land is capable of providing, so finding a property that fits your needs as a hunter, or finding a hunter that has wants that your land can supply is paramount.

Non-Fee Lease Agreements:

These leases are oftentimes just an exchange of services. For a landowner, this could look like someone clearing cedar trees from sections of your property in exchange for a few seasons of hunting. Or as a hunter, you could negotiate building a fence in exchange for some time hunting on the land. The parameters of non-fee lease agreements are wide open, so you have the opportunity to cater entirely to your land and your own talents.

 

Fee-Lease Agreements:

These leases are negotiated when a hunter pays for the opportunity to hunt on a privately owned property. There are also a wide variety of options for these leases as well. Whether you want to lease property by the day or negotiate a more long term lease, there are as many variations of lease agreements as there are properties that have been leased before. Each one will have it's own time restrictions as well as pricing and location.

Considerations:

Just like anything worth considering, there are positives and negatives to having a hunting lease on your land. Knowing more about what having a hunting lease entails can help you make the right decision for your property!

The PROS:

For hunters, leasing on private property oftentimes allows for a better game selection due to your unique access to this piece of land. It also helps that leasing on private land allows for much easier access to hunting than other venues might.

As for the landowners, not only does leasing provide you an extra income, but it can also help with issues of population control on your land. Healthy for your wallet and your land!

 

The CONS: 

If you are a landowner thinking about leasing out your property to hunters it is important to keep in mind that sometimes people may not respect your land as well as you would. If boundaries are not set in the lease agreement,  landowners run the risk of their property being overhunted or damaged in some way. The best way to avoid this is to set clear guidelines in your lease that will protect you and your property alike from being taken advantage of.

Another way to ensure that you are placing your property and wildlife in capable hands is to ask them to provide references. Oftentimes hunters will have leased on other properties before or they have people who can vouch for their character. 

Other Sources:

Whether you choose to lease or not, it is a good idea to dive into more information about the subject so you can make an educated decision. Here are the links to a few resources that may help you out! 

- Whitetail Properties Blog: This is a great post about the logistics of hunting leases and it helps showcase the options that leasers and hunters have when looking for an agreement.

- Texas Bowhunter Forum: This forum is a great place to pose any questions you have about leasing. You can find answers and advice from people who have first-hand experience with hunting leases.

- Base Camp Leasing: Check out available hunting leases in multiple states or post your own property and find potential lessees.

 

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