Cochran County, Texas

Texas Panhandle | Texas South Plains Land and Ranches for Sale

Cochran County, Texas

Cochrane County is located in the South Plains bordering New Mexico. Land features small lakes, underground water, loam and sandy loam soils. Local economy consists of farming, government services and agriculture.

Land and Ranch Market Snapshot

Average Price $208K
Lowest Price $208K
Highest Price $208K
Total Listings 1
Avg. Price/SQFT $0

Property Types (active listings)

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Cochran County Land & Ranch Listings

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All Listings $200,000 - $300,000

Land for sale cochran county

Where is Cochran County, Texas?

  • Cochran County, on the southern High Plains, is bordered on the west by New Mexico, on the north by Bailey County, on the east by Hockley County, and on the south by Yoakum County. It was named for Robert Cochran, who died at the Alamo.

  • The center point of the county is 33°35' north latitude and 102°50' west longitude, some fifty miles west of Lubbock. Cochran County covers 783 square miles of level prairie with elevations varying from 3,500 to 3,800 feet above sea level; loamy or sandy soils predominate. Many small lakes dot the county, including Silver Lake, a small salt lake known to Spanish explorers as Laguna Quemado. State highways 214 (north–south), 114 (east–west), and 125 (east–west) serve the county.

Adjacent Counties

  • Bailey County (north)
  • Hockley County (east)
  • Yoakum County (south)
  • Lea County, New Mexico (southwest/Mountain Time Zone)
  • Roosevelt County, New Mexico (northwest/Mountain Time Zone)

Sites and Attractions in Cochran County 

  •  Local attractions include Last Frontier Days in July, a rodeo, and a museum. Morton (population, 1,885) is the county's largest town and its seat of government. Cultural events include a rodeo, county fair, and a museum.
  • According to archeological evidence, Indians hunted in the area that is now Cochran County 5,000 to 10,000 years ago. In the 1600s Kiowas and Apaches made war and hunted in the region after acquiring horses from the Spanish.

Farming and Ranching in Cochran County 

  • Rainfall in the area averages 15.62 inches a year; the average minimum temperature in January is 23° F; the average high in July is 92° F. The growing season lasts 189 days. Mesquite and grama grasses provide much of the ground cover.
  •  More than 3,827,500 barrels of oil were produced in the county in 2004; by the end of that year 503,034,125 barrels of petroleum had been taken from county lands since 1936. In 2002 the county had 292 farms and ranches covering 439,252 acres, 88 percent of which were devoted to crops and 31 percent to pasture. That year farmers and ranchers in the area earned $39,536,000; crop sales accounted for $37,239,000 of the total. Cotton, sorghum, wheat, peanuts, and sunflowers were the chief agricultural products.

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