Concho County, Texas

West Texas Land and Ranches for Sale

Concho County, Texas

Concho County is located on Edwards Plateau and consists of rough broken to level topography. Land features sandy, loam and dark soils that drain to creeks, the Colorado and the Concho River. Local economy consists of agribusiness and manufacturing.

Land and Ranches Market Snapshot

Average Price $3.3M
Lowest Price $2.7M
Highest Price $3.8M
Total Listings 4
Avg. Days On Market 102
Avg. Price/SQFT $1.6K

Property Types (active listings)

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Concho County Land and Ranches for Sale

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Where is Concho County, Texas?

  • Concho County, in Central Texas, straddles the northern edge of the Edwards Plateau. The county derives its name from the Concho (or "Shell") River, which in turn was named for the large number of mussels found there. The center of the county lies at approximately 31°20' north latitude and 99°52' west longitude. Paint Rock, the county seat, is situated in the north central part of the county on U.S. Highway 83, approximately thirty miles east of San Angelo and 150 miles northwest of Austin. Concho County comprises 992 square miles with an elevation of 1,600 to 2,100 feet above mean sea level.

  • As of the 2010 census, the population was 4,087. The county was founded in 1858 and later organized in 1879. It is named for the Concho River.

Adjacent Counties

  • Runnels County (north)
  • Coleman County (northeast)
  • McCulloch County (east)
  • Menard County (south)
  • Tom Green County (west)

Sites and Attractions in Concho County

  • County attractions include boating, hunting, fishing, the Paint Rock pictographs, and the Concho County Fair, which is held annually in August and September.
  • Ballinger is 36 miles north of Eden.  It offers a quaint district, many antique shops, and beautifully restored historic homes.  Ballinger is the perfect host city for the newest and hottest fishing spot in Texas, O.H. Ivie Reservoir, located 20 miles away and offering 25,000 surface acres of water recreation.  It also stages a number of annual events to intrigue the visitor.

  • Brady is 32 miles east of Eden.  Brady is the home of the world championship goat cookoff held the 1st weekend in September.  Brady boasts of superb hunting.  Brady Lake provides fishing, boating, sking, camping and RVing.  Other interesting attractions are The Heart of Texas Historical Museum and the Heart of Texas County Museum.

  • Coleman is 55 miles northeast of Eden in what is known as "the Land of the Lakes."  Major lakes around Coleman offer fun and recreation: Hords Creek Lake, Lake Coleman, Lake Scarbrough, Memory Lake, Lake Novice, Lake San Tana and the newest, Lake O.H. Ivie.  Fort Colorado is in Coleman's city park, featuring replicas of old pioneer life, a blacksmith shop and a larger-than-life horse statue.

Farming and Ranching in Concho County

  • The creekbeds were originally thick with elm, live oak, and post oak trees. Of the total county area, 11 to 20 percent is considered to be prime farmland. Temperatures range from an average low of 33° F in January to an average high of 97° in July. Rainfall averages twenty-three inches; snowfall, three inches; and the growing season, 228 days per year. The climate, on the whole, is mild and dry. Natural resources include oil and gas, limestone, caliche, dolomite, and bituminous coal. In 1982, 218,748 barrels of oil and 1,982,444 thousand cubic feet of gas-well gas were produced in the county.
  •  In 2002 the county had 411 farms and ranches covering 544,312 acres, 72 percent of which were devoted to pasture and 26 percent to crops. That year farmers and ranchers in the area earned $14,309,000; livestock sales accounted for $7,444,000 of the total. Sheep, cattle, goats and feed grain were the chief agricultural products. More than 506,500 barrels of oil were produced in the county in 2004; by the end of that year 25,948,824 barrels of petroleum had been taken from county lands since 1940, when oil was first discovered in the area.

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