Hockley County, Texas

Texas Panhandle | Texas South Plains Land and Ranches for Sale

Hockley County, Texas

Hockley County is located on the South Plains with numerous playas that drain to the Yellow House Draw. Land features loam and sandy loam soils. Local economy consists of extensive oil and gas production, manufacturing, and varied agribusiness.

Land and Ranch Market Snapshot

Average Price $1.1M
Lowest Price $376K
Highest Price $2.5M
Total Listings 6
Avg. Price/SQFT $198

Property Types (active listings)

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Hockley County Land & Ranch Listings

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Land for sale hockley county

Where is Hockley County, Texas?

  • Hockley County is in northwestern Texas, south of the Panhandle and on the Llano Estacado, bordered on the east by Lubbock County, on the south by Terry County, on the west by Cochran County, and on the north by Lamb County. The center of the county lies at approximately 33°36' north latitude and 102°21' west longitude, thirty miles west of Lubbock. The county, named for George W. Hockley, comprises 908 square miles of generally flat land that drains to numerous playas, the Yellow House River, and Yellow House Lake. Elevations range from 3,300 to 3,650 feet above sea level.

  • As of the 2010 census, its population was 22,935. Its county seat is Levelland. The county was created in 1876, but not organized until 1921. It is named for George Washington Hockley, a secretary of war of the Republic of Texas. Hockley County comprises the Levelland Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is included in the Lubbock–Levelland Combined Statistical Area.

Adjacent Counties

  • Lamb County (north)
  • Lubbock County (east)
  • Terry County (south)
  • Cochran County (west)
  • Yoakum County (southwest)
  • Bailey County (northwest)
  • Hale County (northeast)
  • Lynn County (southeast)

Sites and Attractions in Hockley County

  • The settlement of Balch, Texas was named to honor A. P. Balch, a director of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway railroad. Settlement never materialized although the railroad stop became a popular shipping point for area farmers. The only signs of civilization today are a few vacant buildings and the towering grain elevator.
  • In prehistoric times Folsom man hunted in the area. Spanish explorers ventured into or near Hockley County during the sixteenth century, and in the early eighteenth century the Comanches displaced the Apaches in the region. Much of the history of the area revolves around Yellow House Canyon. The Comanches, hunting buffalo and attacking enemies, watered at the springs in the canyon for decades before White men took an interest in the region; the canyon lay along a north-south trail between New Mexico and Mexico.

Farming and Ranching in Hockley County 

  • The annual rainfall in Hockley County averages 16.6 inches; the temperature varies from average minimum of 24° F in January to an average maximum of 93° in July; the growing season lasts 196 days. The county's economy produces an average annual income of $71 million from agriculture, 70 percent of which comes from crops that include cotton, sorghums, wheat, soybeans, corn, hay, and sunflowers. The rest comes from cattle, hogs, and sheep. Irrigated land totals about 200,000 acres. In 1982 oil production in Hockley County totaled more than 39,000,000 barrels, worth $1,203,962,293. Petroleum processing, the manufacture of oilfield equipment, processing of vegetable oil, and cattle feeding are industries complementing the area's large oil production.
  • Soils vary from clay loam to sandy loam, with most of the latter in the western and southern regions. Grasses include buffalo, grama, and mesquite. Yellow House Canyon cuts into the northern part of the county and is mostly grass-covered, although sand hills and gravel deposits occur. The canyon, once a tributary of the Brazos River, is one of the most salient landmarks on the South Plains; it takes its name from high, yellow bluffs near its head.

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