Marion County, Texas

North East Texas Land and Ranches for Sale

Marion County, Texas

Marion County is located in Northeastern Texas and consists of hilly terrain with three-quarters forested with pines and hardwoods. Also features Caddo Lake, Lake O' the Pines, Big Cypress Bayou, and Jonson Creek Reservoir. Local economy is comprised of agriculture, tourism, forestry, and food processing.

Land and Ranch Market Snapshot

Average Price $1M
Lowest Price $675K
Highest Price $1.8M
Total Listings 7
Avg. Days On Market 92
Avg. Price/SQFT $232

Property Types (active listings)

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Marion County Land and Ranches for Sale

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Where is Marion County, Texas?

  • Marion County is in northeastern Texas; its eastern boundary forms a portion of the Louisiana-Texas border. Jefferson, the county's largest town and its county seat, is seventeen miles north of Marshall, in Harrison County, and forty-six miles west of Shreveport, Louisiana. The county's center is at 32°47' north latitude and 94°20' west longitude. Marion County covers 380 square miles of the dense timberlands of East Texas.

  • As of the 2010 census, its population was 10,546; in 2018 it had an estimated population of 9,928. Marion County is in East Texas and is named for Francis Marion, the Revolutionary War general from South Carolina who was nicknamed the "Swamp Fox".

Adjacent Counties

  • Cass County (north)
  • Caddo Parish, Louisiana (east)
  • Harrison County (south)
  • Upshur County (west)
  • Morris County (northwest)

Sites and Attractions in Marion County

  • The Historic Jefferson Railway is a 3 ft (914 mm) narrow gauge railroad in Jefferson, Texas. It is an insular line that follows the Big Cypress Bayou for approximately three miles. The line is a dog bone way out with loops on each end, joined by a single main track. Privately owned and operated by DBR Entertainment Inc., it does not depend on any state or federal funding. The train travels through the piney woods of northeast Texas, a densely forested region of the state.

  • A restored 1888 Federal Court House and U.S. Post Office building is home to the Jefferson Historical Museum, a prominent downtown structure containing four floors of exhibits and items chronicling the region’s past. Included among the impressive collections are Civil War artifacts, antique furniture, tools and weapons, rare china, Caddo Indian relics, and several of Sam Houston’s historic papers.

Farming and Ranching in Marion County 

  • The region's mineral deposits include oil, natural gas, clay, and lignite coal. Temperatures range from an average low of 32° F to an average high of 54° F in January and from 71° to 93° F in July. The growing season is 236 days in length, and the yearly rainfall is forty-four to forty-five inches.
  • The land surface is a gently rolling, rich, sandy loam, underlain by a clay foundation and cloaked by pine, cypress, and oak forests. The elevation is 200 to 500 feet above sea level. The county is drained by the Red River basin via the watershed areas of Caddo Lake, Lake o' the Pines, and Big Cypress, Little Cypress, and Black Cypress bayous. 
  • In the early twenty-first century tourism, timber, and food processing plants were key elements of the area’s economy. In 2002 the county had 252 farms and ranches covering 59,602 acres, 38 percent of which were devoted to woodlands, 35 percent to pasture, and 29 percent to crops. In that year farmers and ranchers in the area earned $4,087,000, with livestock sales accounting for $3,343,000 of the total. Beef cattle, hay, and goats were the chief agricultural products.
  • More than 11,652,000 cubic feet of pinewood and almost 1,805,000 cubic feet of hardwood were harvested in the county in 2003, and more than 181,000 barrels of oil and 4,735,632 cubic feet of gas-well gas were produced there in 2004. By the end of that year 55,597,674 barrels of oil had been taken from county lands since 1910.
 

A restored 1888 Federal Court House and U.S. Post Office building is home to the Jefferson Historical Museum, a prominent downtown structure containing four floors of exhibits and items chronicling the region’s past. Included among the impressive collections are Civil War artifacts, antique furniture, tools and weapons, rare china, Caddo Indian relics and several of Sam Houston’s historic papers.
A restored 1888 Federal Court House and U.S. Post Office building is home to the Jefferson Historical Museum, a prominent downtown structure containing four floors of exhibits and items chronicling the region’s past. Included among the impressive collections are Civil War artifacts, antique furniture, tools and weapons, rare china, Caddo Indian relics and several of Sam Houston’s historic papers.
A restored 1888 Federal Court House and U.S. Post Office building is home to the Jefferson Historical Museum, a prominent downtown structure containing four floors of exhibits and items chronicling the region’s past. Included among the impressive collections are Civil War artifacts, antique furniture, tools and weapons, rare china, Caddo Indian relics and several of Sam Houston’s historic papers.

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