Victoria County, Texas

Upper Texas Gulf Coast | Brazos River Bottom Land and Ranches for Sale

Victoria County, Texas

Victoria County features rolling prairies intersected by many streams with sandy loams, clays and alluvial soils. Local economy consists of petrochemical plants, government services, oil, manufacturing, agribusiness, and tourism.

Land and Ranch Market Snapshot

Average Price $1.6M
Lowest Price $258K
Highest Price $23.6M
Total Listings 69
Avg. Days On Market 162
Avg. Price/SQFT $368

Property Types (active listings)

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Victoria County Land and Ranches for Sale

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Land for sale victoria county 

Where is Victoria County, Texas?

  • Victoria County is in southeastern Texas on the Coastal Plain about midway between the southern and eastern extremities of the Texas Gulf Coast. Victoria, the county's largest town, is the county seat. There roads converge 120 miles from Houston, 102 miles from San Antonio, 110 miles from Austin, and 75 miles from Corpus Christi; hence the town's nickname, the "crossroads of South Texas." The county's center lies at approximately 28°47' north latitude and 96°57' west longitude. Victoria County comprises 887 square miles of nearly level to gently rolling coastal prairie.

  • The northwestern part of the county lies in the Post Oak Belt and thus marks the southernmost extension of the East Texas timberlands. The elevation ranges from sea level in the southeast to 300 feet near Mission Valley in the northwest.

Adjacent Counties

  • Lavaca County (north)
  • Jackson County (northeast)
  • Calhoun County (southeast)
  • Refugio County (south)
  • Goliad County (southwest)
  • DeWitt County (northwest)

Sites and Attractions in Victoria County

  • The Texas Zoo is home to over 100 species of animals, with some native to Texas while others can only be found in remote, exotic locations around the world. A large portion of The Texas Zoo’s collection is comprised of rescue animals that could not be returned to the wild, came from owners that could no longer provide the required care, or even from a future that lead them to the meat market.
  • At The Museum of the Coastal Bend in Victoria, Texas there are permanent exhibit displays the last 13,000 years of Texas history, from the first inhabitants of the Coastal Bend region through the French, Spanish, and Mexican colonial efforts, up to the range of diverse influence that have created the modern Texan culture.

  • The Victoria Regional Museum Association (VRMA), Inc. was formed in 1976 when the Royston Nave Memorial was given to the City of Victoria to serve as an art museum. The Nave Museum is the oldest fine arts museum in the Crossroads area. The Nave Museum is a fine arts museum serving Victoria and the surrounding region, which features four to six exhibits a year.

Farming and Ranching in Victoria County

  • The climate is humid and subtropical, with a temperature range from an average high of 92° F in July to an average low of 46° in January; records of 110° and 9° were set in 1939 and 1930, respectively. The average annual length of the frost-free season is 290 days; the annual precipitation range is from thirty-two to forty inches. The northeastern half of the county drains into Lavaca Bay, principally through Garcitas, Arenosa, and Placedo creeks, and the southwestern area is drained by the Guadalupe and San Antonio rivers and Coleto Creek.
  • In 2002 the county had 1,286 farms and ranches covering 513,828 acres, 32 percent of which were devoted to crops. That year farmers and ranchers in the area earned $29,064,000; livestock sales accounted for $15,106,000 of the total. Corn, beef cattle, grain sorghums, cotton, rice, and soybeans were the chief agricultural products. More than 922,000 barrels of oil, and 23,859,338 thousand cubic feet of gas well gas, were produced in the county in 2004; by the end of that year 3,285,627,108 barrels of oil had been taken from county lands since 1931.
 

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