Walker County, Texas

Upper Texas Gulf Coast | Brazos River Bottom Land and Ranches for Sale

Walker County, Texas

Walker County is located in South Central Texas just north of Houston. Land features rolling hills, with more than 70 percent forested, national forests, San Jacinto and Trinity rivers, Lake Livingston and Lake Conroe. Local economy consists of state prison employment and education.

Land and Ranch Market Snapshot

Average Price $1.6M
Lowest Price $267K
Highest Price $15.4M
Total Listings 70
Avg. Days On Market 173
Avg. Price/SQFT $912

Property Types (active listings)

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Walker County Land and Ranches for Sale

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Land for sale walker county

Where is Walker County, Texas?

  • Walker County is in southeast Texas. The center of the county is at 30°47' north latitude and 95°33' west longitude. Huntsville, the county seat, is near the center of the county sixty miles north of Houston. The area was originally named for Robert J. Walker of Mississippi, who introduced into the United States Congress the resolution for the annexation of Texas; because he was a Unionist during the Civil War, however, in 1863 the state legislature changed the honoree to Samuel H. Walker.

  • The area rests at the extreme western end of the Coastal Plain region. Elevations in the county range from 140 to 404 feet above sea level. The land is well watered, receiving forty-six inches of rain each year, and is drained by two major rivers, the Trinity River in the north and the San Jacinto River in the south. Numerous creeks also cross the county. Bedias Creek forms part of the northwestern boundary and empties into the Trinity River, as do Harmon, Carolina, and Nelson creeks. Mill, East and West Sandy, and Robinson creeks drain into the San Jacinto River in the south.

  • Walker County is crossed by the Union Pacific Railroad and Interstate Highway 45. Transportation in the area is also facilitated by a series of farm-to-market roads radiating outward from Huntsville.

Adjacent Counties

  • Houston County (north)
  • Trinity County (northeast)
  • San Jacinto County (east)
  • Montgomery County (south)
  • Grimes County (west)
  • Madison County (northwest)

Sites and Attractions in Walker County

  • Huntsville State Park is a 2,083.2-acre wooded recreational area, six miles southwest of Huntsville, Texas, within Walker County and the Sam Houston National Forest.
  • A large portion of the county is owned by two public agencies, the state prison system and the National Forest Service. Numerous prison farms are operated by the prison system. Huntsville is home to the Sam Houston Memorial Museum and hosts a number of annual events, including the Walker County Fair in July.

  • The Texas Prison Museum is located in Huntsville, Texas. The non-profit museum features the history of the prison system in Texas. There are many different artifacts in the museum, including an electric chair named "Old Sparky" that was formerly used from 1924 to 1964 as the primary means of execution.

Farming and Ranching in Walker County 

  •  Temperatures range from an average low of 38° F in January to an average high of 95° F in July; the growing season lasts 265 days. Clay deposits-ceramic and brick clays and Fuller's earth-have been mined commercially, as have other minerals, including sand, gravel, lignite, volcanic ash, and petroleum.
  •  In 2002 the county had 1,043 farms and ranches covering 206,311 acres, 46 percent of which were devoted to pasture, 30 percent to crops, and 22 percent to woodlands. That year Walker County farmers and ranchers earned $25,372,000, with crop sales accounting for $13,832,000 of that total. Cattle, nursery crops, poultry, cotton, and hay were the chief agricultural products. Almost 11,613,000 cubic feet of pinewood and almost 649,000 cubic feet of hardwood were harvested in the county in 2003.
 

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