Webb County, Texas

South Texas Land and Ranches for Sale

Webb County, Texas

Webb County is located in Southwestern Texas on the Rio Grande. Land features rolling, hills, brush, sandy, gray soils, and alluvial soil along the river. Local economy consists of international trade, manufacturing, tourism, government services and natural gas and oil.

Land and Ranch Market Snapshot

Average Price $2.2M
Lowest Price $650K
Highest Price $4.3M
Total Listings 11
Avg. Days On Market 266
Avg. Price/SQFT $152

Property Types (active listings)

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Webb County Land and Ranches for Sale

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All Listings $600,000 - $700,000 Over $1,000,000

land for sale webb county

Where is Webb County, Texas?

  • Webb County is in South Texas along the Mexican border. Laredo, the county's largest town and seat of government, is in the southwestern part of the county at the intersection of U.S. Highway 59 and Interstate Highway 35. The center of the county is at 27°45' north latitude and 99°20' west longitude. Webb County includes 3,363 square miles of generally flat to rolling terrain covered with grasses, mesquite, thorny shrubs, and cacti. Elevation ranges from 400 to 700 feet, and soils are primarily clayey and loamy.

  • As of the 2010 census, its population was 250,304. The county was named after James Webb (1792–1856), who served as secretary of the treasury, secretary of state, and attorney general of the Republic of Texas, and later judge of the United States District Court following the admission of Texas to statehood. By area, Webb County is the largest county in South Texas and the sixth largest in the state. Webb County includes the Laredo metropolitan area. Webb County is the only county in the United States to border three foreign states or provinces, sharing borders with Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas.

Adjacent Counties

  • Dimmit County (north)
  • La Salle County (north)
  • Duval County (east)
  • Jim Hogg County (southeast)
  • Zapata County (south)
  • Maverick County (northwest)
  • McMullen County, Texas (northeast)
  • Guerrero, Coahuila, Mexico (west)
  • Hidalgo, Coahuila, Mexico (west)
  • Anáhuac, Nuevo León, Mexico (west)
  • Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico (southwest)
  • Guerrero, Tamaulipas, Mexico (southwest)

Sites and Attractions in Webb County 

  • El Azteca is one of the oldest and most intact residential neighborhoods in Laredo, Texas, with buildings dating from the 1870s representing nearly every major architectural type and style that has appeared on the border since that time. 
  • Fort McIntosh was a U.S. Army base in Laredo, Webb County, Texas, from 1849 to 1946. Fort McIntosh was established on 3 March 1849 by the 1st US Infantry, under the command of Lt. E.L. Viele, to guard the Texas frontier at the site of a strategic river crossing.
  • Built in 1900 and expanded in 1923, the Hamilton Hotel is today a residential building for the elderly. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1992.

Farming and Ranching in Webb County

  • The northern and eastern sections are drained by a number of creeks that flow north and eventually enter the Nueces River; the southern and western parts of the county are drained by the Rio Grande. Mineral resources include caliche, clay, uranium, oil, natural gas, and zeolite. Temperatures range from an average high of 100° F in July to an average low of 43° in January. Rainfall averages twenty inches per year, and the growing season lasts for 314 days.
  • In 2002 the county had 568 farms and ranches covering 2,042,680 acres, 94 percent of which were devoted to pasture. That year farmers and ranchers in the area earned $23,042,000; livestock sales accounted for $22,374,000 of the total. Cattle, horses, goats, onions, melons and nursery plants were the chief agricultural products. More than 1,483,800 barrels of oil, and 236,180,010 thousand cubic feet of gas well gas, were produced in the county in 2004; by the end of that year 160,384,486 barrels of oil had been taken from county lands since 1921. 
 

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