Zavala County, Texas

South Texas Land and Ranches for Sale

Zavala County, Texas

Zavala County is located in Southwestern Texas near the Mexican border. Land features rolling plains broken by much brush. Also includes Nueces, Leona, other streams and the Upper Nueces Reservoir. Local economy consists of agribusiness, food packaging, leading county in Winter Garden truck-farming, and government services.

Land and Ranch Market Snapshot

Average Price $1.6M
Lowest Price $1.6M
Highest Price $1.6M
Total Listings 2
Avg. Days On Market 152
Avg. Price/SQFT $0

Property Types (active listings)

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Zavala County Land and Ranches for Sale

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All Listings $200,000 - $300,000 Over $1,000,000

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Where is Zavala County, Texas?

  • Zavala County, in the Winter Garden Region of Southwest Texas, is 170 miles northwest of Corpus Christi. It borders Maverick, Uvalde, Frio, and Dimmit counties. Its center point is at 28°51' north latitude and 99°45' west longitude. Crystal City, the county seat, is in south central Zavala County on U.S. Highway 83. The rectangular county has an area of 1,298 square miles. The Nueces River drains the central and western region, and the Leona and Frio rivers drain the eastern. Comanche Lake, six miles west of Crystal City, is popular with sportsmen and is believed to be the site of the last Indian raid in Texas.

  • As of the 2010 census, the population was 11,677. The county was created in 1858 and later organized in 1884. Zavala is named for Lorenzo de Zavala, Mexican politician, signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence, and first vice president of the Republic of Texas.

Adjacent Counties

  • Uvalde County (north)
  • Frio County (east)
  • Dimmit County (south)
  • Maverick County (west)
  • La Salle County (southeast)

Sites and Attractions in Zavala County 

  • The area between the Rio Grande and the Nueces River, which included Zavala County, became disputed territory known as the Wild Horse Desert, where neither the Republic of Texas nor the Mexican government had clear control. Ownership was in dispute until the Mexican–American War. The area became filled with lawless characters who deterred settlers in the area.

  • Averhoff Reservoir is a 173-acre narrow, riverine-type reservoir located on the Nueces River 10 mi north of the town of Crystal City in Zavala County, Texas, United States, and 100 miles from San Antonio, Texas. 
  • Attractions in Zavala County include hunting, fishing, and the annual Spinach Festival.

Farming and Ranching in Zavala County 

  • The climate is continental, semiarid, and influenced by winds from the Gulf of Mexico; the average annual rainfall is 21.87 inches. Zavala County farmers can expect a growing season of 282 days, with the last freeze in late February and the first freeze in early December. Rainfall, often occurring in the form of thunderstorms in the spring and fall, is impounded in earth reservoirs to supply water for livestock and for irrigation of some crops.
  • The climate is extremely favorable for the cultivation of winter vegetables. Temperatures in winter are generally mild; summers are hot and humid, with temperatures often above 100° F. The topography of the county consists of generally flat land and slightly undulating plains. Elevations range from 580 feet above sea level in the south to 964 feet in the north. The proliferation of nutritious grasses, including the grama, buffalo, and mesquite species, form the basis for Zavala County's successful ranching industry.
  • In 2002 the county had 257 farms and ranches covering 707,383 acres, 82 percent of which were devoted to pasture and 14 percent to crops. That year farmers and ranchers in the area earned $48,694,000; crop sales accounted for $37,878,000 of the total. Cattle, grains, vegetables, cotton, and pecans were the chief agricultural products. More than 567,890 barrels of oil, and 1,274,321 thousand cubic feet of gas well gas, were produced in the county in 2004; by the end of that year 46,287,131 barrels of oil had been taken from county lands since 1937.
 

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